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One Jersey Guy to Another….

Jul 17

In Friends, Rambling at 8:13am

K-Man and I go back aways. I’ve worked for him as he has organized a number of annual reports and portrait assignments over time. We got to know each well over the course of some occasionally arduous travel. I’m even acquainted with Flo, his non-stop roadie mate. He runs a blog, Jersey Style Photography, and has a passion for old style Hollywood noir. Hence it was a natural to include him, his fedora, and his formidable mohaska back when I was putting together the Hot Shoe Diaries.

He shoots good stuff, and we have always traded pics and chatted about shooting. He commented on Monday’s post when I discussed grain, Tri-x and the amazing advances in digital photography.

“I certainly haven’t done it nearly as long as you (you’ve forgotten more about photography than I’ll probably ever learn) but isn’t it something: You put those first photos online today, and you’d be flamed for “all that grain.” Yet, that baseball pic is, to me, one of your iconic images, one I think about often. Because you got the moment: the expressions, the dust, the dirt. All those old cool concert photos shooters did in dark clubs…the Tri-X is pushed and the grain is there. And the grain is good.

Yet today, we’re trying for those clean photos at hi ISO. It’s a wacky thing, this photography.

Thanks for introducing me to it.”

It is a wacky thing indeed, doing this, either for fun, or serious intent. Grain is good, and has character, and in a funny way, almost immediately locates the viewer of a photo in terms of the era it was made. It’s a totem, a harking back, a reminder of where we came from, long before the age of the highly polished pixel. I find myself experimenting with film again. And at the same time appreciating the unbelievable gifts digital photography has given all of us.

But given the fact he took the time to chime in this week, and mentioned shooting concerts back in the day, I thought I’d ease into the weekend and throw up a few ASA 1600, Tri-x snaps I made at a show with the ultimate Jersey Guy, the Boss, circa 1977-78, Madison Square Garden. Enjoy the weekend everybody! More tk….

 

 

 

 

 

10 Responses to “One Jersey Guy to Another….”

Lewisw says:

on July 17, 2014 at 9:48 am

Have a camera and be there. Thanks for the memories.

Doug Haass says:

on July 17, 2014 at 1:12 pm

I would think these 3 photos, even in today’s high ISO digital world, would stand up to what is being shot now.

JerseyStyle Photography says:

on July 17, 2014 at 1:32 pm

Well don’t that beat all! Me and Bruce, sharing the same stage (well, sort of.)

Yeah, that was fun shooting neo-noir on the streets of NYC. Might be time to add more to your noir portfolio.

‘Cause tramps like, baby, we were born to shoot.

~ Mark

David Wilson says:

on July 17, 2014 at 8:18 pm

Knowing how K-Man likes Bruce, I’m certain you made the K-Man’s day (and week) by having him in the post with Bruce.

John says:

on July 18, 2014 at 10:16 am

Joe,
I’ve learned a lot from you and MANY others; still learning – thankfully. I have to agree about grain.

Grain never made a good picture bad and super sharp grain free resolution never made a bad picture good!

As a Jersey guy myself and rock music fan, it’s great to see your old Bruce shots. Terrific stuff. The grain suits the live music / real life feel of a Bruce performance.

Be well.
John

Alan Hess says:

on July 18, 2014 at 6:25 pm

It really is amazing what the new cameras can do at the high ISO levels. I photographed Cher in concert the other night and while the show had plenty of light, I shot at ISO 800 – 1600 with really no noise at all.

The thing is that if the photo is good, grabs your attention, captures a real moment, the grain or doesn’t matter. The only people who look for noise these days are other photographers. Regular folk who like to look at photos don’t get in really close to see the noise. They step back and look at the image the way should be looked at. As a moment in time captured to tell a story.

Richard Hales says:

on July 19, 2014 at 12:42 am

Reminds of the days I turned up with gigs with TMAX 3200 and Fuji 1600 (E6). I only managed a few gigs of well known bands (well known in the UK) and many of bands that didn’t last the course but I still have a slight case of one-sided deafness as my battle scar and some hazy memories of smoke filed rooms.

Brant Thompson says:

on July 23, 2014 at 8:21 am

Great post Joe. It reminds me of how a lot of people hold onto those vinyl records just for the “crackle” that they produce when playing them. The “grain” in old photos at high ASA values can be viewed in the same way… it just can’t be reproduced like that anymore.

This makes me want to break out my old Pentax P30 35mm again. Ha, I just talked about it in my last blog post… what a coincidence :)

Have a good day!

Brant

theworldthrubrantseyes.blogspot.com
@Brant_and_Pinky

Lu says:

on July 28, 2014 at 6:03 am

Loved them all! I was automatically transported to the smell of cigarettes and sweat from a long lived concert when I saw the iso 1600 photos.

cong ty bao ve says:

on July 29, 2014 at 5:04 am

The thing is that if the photo is good, grabs your attention, captures a real moment, the grain or doesn’t matter. The only people who look for noise these days are other photographers. Regular folk who like to look at photos don’t get in really close to see the noise. They step back and look at the image the way should be looked at. As a moment in time captured to tell a story.

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